When you open up your world to wildlife, the rewards can be rich and fulfilling. When you open up your garden to give nature room to flourish, you must do so with a sense of acceptance that your patch of ground will become a feeding station, a nursery, a battleground. We have naughty badgers and cheeky foxes who dig and defecate, but there is no sense in getting cross if you have invited them in and take pleasure from knowing that they regard your garden as good habitat. However, I was driven to fury this morning by a discovery in my vegetable patch.

Last season, I lost a few seed-potatoes to foxes that pulled them out of the ground. Mostly, they were scattered around and about, but a couple disappeared completely, presumed eaten. I found one yesterday behind a large growing sack. I wasn’t angry that the fox had dug it up and discarded it, I objected to the fact that her potato yielded twice as much as any of my cosseted plants!

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Written by Redgannet
Redgannet has been working for over 33 years as a crew member/flight attendant and enjoys the well-ventilated air of the outdoors. The nom de blog, Redgannet, was adopted to add an air of mystery and to make himself more attractive to women. His father first whetted Redguga's appetite for all things natural by buying him his first pair of 7x35s and a copy of Thorburn's Birds. Having no mentor beyond an indulgent parent, he spent the first season hoping for an Egyptian Vulture at the bird table in his English garden. His most memorable birding moment is seeing an Egyptian Vulture with those same binoculars 26 years later. Redgannet is married to Canon, but his heart and half of his house belongs to Helen and their son Joseph. He is looking forward to communicating with people who don't ask if he is searching for the "feathered variety" of bird.