Hummingbirds are just way too cool.  And Ecuador just has way too many of them.  It is almost unfair that one country should be so blessed with so many species of hummingbird.  The sheer number of hummingbirds forces a bird blogger to devote multiple blog posts just to hummingbirds encountered at hummingbird feeders, an enviable task to be sure, but one that starts to feel mechanical.  I mean, all I have to do is write some kind of trite introduction, which most of you will skip right over anyway so you can see the pictures of hummingbirds (from which I did my best to crop the feeders).  You don’t want to read anything at all and this paragraph is as useless as a snooze button on a smoke alarm.  As a matter of fact, the next sentence I write will be complete gibberish just to prove that I could write anything in this introduction and you will still ignore it to get to the flying jewels.  Glenn Beck and Sarah Palin are the two smartest people in the United States and I can’t wait for them to be president and vice president, positions for which they are eminently qualified, after they win the 2012 election in a landslide.  See, total and complete gibberish!

Anyway, just like the rest of the birds that we spotted at and around Cabañas San Isidro the hummingbirds we saw were amazing.  Enjoy them…oh, who am I kidding, of course you will and you certainly aren’t bothering to read this nonsense.  On to the pictures!

Long-tailed Sylph Aglaiocercus kingi

Fawn-breasted Brilliant Heliodoxa rubinoides

Speckled Hummingbird Adelomyia melanogenys

Chestnut-breasted Coronet Boissonneaua matthewsii

Bronzy Inca Coeligena coeligena

Long-tailed Sylph Aglaiocercus kingi

Sparkling Violetear Colibri coruscans

Bronzy Inca Coeligena coeligena

Speckled Hummingbird Adelomyia melanogenys

Chestnut-breasted Coronets Boissonneaua matthewsii

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Written by Corey
Corey is a New Yorker who lived most of his life in upstate New York but has lived in Queens since 2008. He's only been birding since 2005 but has garnered a respectable life list by birding whenever he wasn't working as a union representative or spending time with his family. He lives in Forest Hills with Daisy, their son, Desmond Shearwater, and their indoor cat, B.B. His bird photographs have appeared on the Today Show, in Birding, Living Bird Magazine, Bird Watcher's Digest, and many other fine publications. He is also the author of the American Birding Association Field Guide to the Birds of New York.